Tag Archives: Cheap Boston Scott Jersey

New Orleans Saints Womens Youth Authentic Boston Scott Jersey, Elite Game Limited Boston Scott Jersey, Black Olive Gold Camo Grey Green Pink White Boston Scott Jersey, Salute to Service Rush Boston Scott Jersey.

Cheap NFL Nike New Orleans Saints Jerseys Free Shipping Online

NEW ORLEANS — It wasn’t supposed to look like this. Not again. Not with a young defense that had finally turned things around so impressively last season.

But somehow the New Orleans Saints kicked off the 2018 season with a defensive flop as dreadful as anything they posted in some of those historically bad seasons between 2012 and 2016.

They allowed Ryan Fitzpatrick to throw for 417 yards and four touchdowns and run for a fifth Sunday in a 48-40 loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Bucs had more TD passes of 50-plus yards (two) than punts (one).

It was one of the biggest Week 1 surprises in the NFL — a stunning performance from a team that was anointed as one of this season’s popular Super Bowl picks.

And it’s yet another slow start for the Saints, who haven’t won a season opener since 2013.

“We needed this, we needed to get slapped in our face one good time to see that we’re not on the level we think we’re on. But we’re gonna get better,” Saints cornerback Marshon Lattimore insisted.

The second-year cornerback — the NFL’s 2017 Defensive Rookie of the Year — allowed Buccaneers receiver Mike Evans to have a big day (seven catches for 147 yards and a 50-yard TD) after Lattimore had stifled Evans in both meetings last season.

It was that kind of day for the Saints’ defense.
Cornerback Ken Crawley and the the rest of the Saints’ defense spent a frustrating day chasing DeSean Jackson and the surprising Buccaneers in Week 1. Derick E. Hingle/USA Today Sports
The unit also had a breakdown in zone coverage on Tampa’s fourth play of the game that allowed DeSean Jackson to spring wide open for a 58-yard touchdown catch. If you’re keeping score at home, that’s now two 50-yard plays against a Saints defense that gave up only one play of 50-plus all season in 2017.

Fellow defensive backs such as Ken Crawley, Marcus Williams, Patrick Robinson and Vonn Bell were also victimized in what is expected to be the most talented unit on New Orleans’ defense.

But it wasn’t just the back end that failed to do its job. Coach Sean Payton lamented that Fitzpatrick was “pressure-free” for the most part Sunday.

“Take your pick,” Payton said when he was asked what didn’t work on defense. “We didn’t hurry the passer. Guys were open. Third downs were awful. They had [529] yards. We didn’t disrupt the timing of any element of the passing game. And too many penalties.

“I can’t think of any positives.”

When a reporter started asking Payton a question by saying, “Obviously anything can happen in this league at any time …” Payton cut him off.

“That’s true. And you just saw it happen. So there’s no ‘buts’ after it. You have to come ready to play in this league, period,” Payton said — though he repeatedly credited Tampa Bay and Fitzpatrick, in particular, for doing just that Sunday.

The defensive struggles wasted a dynamic performance by the offense — Drew Brees threw for 439 yards and three TDs, Alvin Kamara scored three times and Michael Thomas caught a franchise-record 16 passes for 180 yards and a TD. The offense also made two costly errors, though, with lost fumbles by Thomas and Mike Gillislee.

No one specifically suggested the Saints came out flat or lackadaisical or overconfident for their season opener: “I don’t think anybody went out there with the mindset that [the Buccaneers] were just gonna roll over because we won the division last year,” Saints defensive tackle Sheldon Rankins said. “They beat us at the end of the year last year, so I’m sure they had all the confidence in the world they could beat us. And they did.”

But the result was exactly the type of “hangover” performance the Saints tried to guard against all summer.

Best of NFL Nation

• Kirk Cousins learns first-hand how good Vikings can be in his debut
• Phillip Dorsett 69th player to catch TD from Tom Brady
• Case Keenum shows why the Broncos went out to get him
• Norv Turner doesn’t shy from using Cam Newton as a runner

Payton tackled those Super Bowl expectations head-on in the first team meeting of training camp, using the message “Prove Them Right” as a way to capture the same mentality of teams who are determined to prove critics wrong. The Saints had a poster with that message hanging outside their team facility throughout training camp.

And they talked all week about avoiding the slow starts that led them to records of 0-2, 0-3, 0-3 and 0-2 over the past four seasons.

But as Lattimore acknowledged, no amount of talk can do the job that they needed to actually do on the field Sunday.

“I mean, we like to do what we say, of course. But it’s not always gonna end up like that. It takes time to be a great team,” he said. “You know, there’s a lot of new guys on the team, and we’re still trying to jell together and get right.

“It’s the first game. Don’t panic. We went 0-2 last year and went on an eight-game winning streak. … We’re still together. We’re gonna get it right.”
The good news about that trend of slow starts is that the Saints have been here before. All too many times. Last season, their defense got torched for a total of 1,025 yards in the first two games of the season against the Minnesota Vikings and New England Patriots, respectively, before that epic turnaround that led to an 11-5 season and the NFC South title.

“It’s not a death sentence,” Rankins said. “You take it on the chin, you learn from it and you play better next week.”

“Hopefully the Super Bowl isn’t won Week 1,” Saints defensive end Cameron Jordan said. “We’ve got a lot of things we have to address, and I’m my toughest critic. And I guess my dad would be my second-toughest critic — so I’m looking forward to that phone call.

“[But] we have a 24-hour rule. We have to wipe our mind clean of this catastrophe that just happened. You can’t be proud of 41 points on the board (by the Bucs offense). But we have to push forward.”

Wholesale Authentic New Orleans Saints Jerseys Gear Online

METAIRIE, La. — The legend of Taysom Hill just keeps growing in New Orleans.

Now it’s time to find out if he can live up to it.

“I was kind of joking around with a few guys that this is the first opportunity I’ve had to take a rep at quarterback in the New Orleans Saints’ offense. So these last [two weeks of OTA practices] have been a ton of fun,” said the second-year quarterback, who managed to create an enormous amount of buzz last fall — even though he barely even saw the practice field as the Saints’ third-stringer.

For those who might have missed it, here’s how this unique and surprising tall tale started:

Hill, an undrafted dual-threat quarterback out of BYU, had an impressive preseason with the Green Bay Packers in 2017. But the Packers let him go when they cut their roster to 53 players in September, and the Saints quickly snatched him off the waiver wire.

Flash forward to December, when two eye-opening things happened.

First, Hill started playing on special teams — and actually thriving in kick coverage — after the Saints found a rare way to use his skill set as a big, athletic, 6-foot-2, 221-pounder.

Best of NFL Nation
• Why Falcons’ D expects to be top 5
• A lot riding on Jets’ Trumaine Johnson
• DeMeco Ryans to mentor Reuben Foster
• Bud Dupree’s mission: double-digit sacks
• More aggressive Patriots defense in 2018?
Then the Fox broadcast team revealed that Saints coach Sean Payton was absolutely enamored with Hill’s potential, with Payton even going so far as to suggest in their production meetings that Drew Brees’ heir “is in the building.”

Of course, Payton tried to walk those comments back a little bit. How could the Saints be convinced Hill is their next starting quarterback when he hadn’t really even practiced running their offense yet (only doing a little work with the scout teams last season)?

But make no mistake, the Saints’ coaching staff is extremely excited about Hill’s potential, as quarterbacks coach Joe Lombardi continued to demonstrate in comments made to the New Orleans Advocate during the first week of OTAs.

“The guy is a freak athlete. I’ve never seen anyone like him at this position,” said Lombardi, who said Hill “might be the strongest guy on the team” — at least “pound for pound.”

“He might be the strongest squatter,” Lombardi said of Hill’s weight-room prowess.

Lombardi also tried to tone down the hype a little bit when I followed up with him a few days ago. But he didn’t shy away from the fact Hill has some athletic traits that are rare for the position, including his blazing 40-yard dash time of 4.44 seconds at his pro day.

That helped Hill run for 2,815 yards and 32 touchdowns in college, to go with his 6,929 passing yards and 43 TD passes. He also threw for two touchdowns and ran for another during the Packers’ preseason last year.

“You just don’t see guys that are as strong and as fast as him very often. … Oftentimes those guys are playing safety or running back or receiver,” Lombardi said. “A guy that can run like that obviously causes problems for a defense, in a different way than maybe a Drew Brees does.

“So he has traits that can help him be successful. And obviously his job and our job is to help him mold those traits into a guy that can effectively play the position.”

Lombardi also mentioned to The Advocate that one of the strengths Hill has shown so far in practice is the ability to make throws down the field while on the move outside the pocket.

“Every great quarterback has to have a way of making a play when the play call isn’t perfect,” Lombardi said. “Someone’s not open right away, or the pressure gets to you, and you have certain guys like Tom Brady or Drew, they do it by finding these creative throws or getting the ball out so quick and having that sixth sense of where to go with the ball. Other guys get away from the rush, and they get outside the pocket, and they create. You see Aaron Rodgers and those kind of guys make plays that way.”

Only two of the Saints’ OTA practices have been open to the media so far. But Hill has turned heads on a couple of plays — one when he took off running down the field and one when he made a strong throw across his body.

“He looks good,” Payton said. “We like where he’s at. He’s grinding, working hard. You guys saw maybe a play where when he does get outside the pocket, he can run — I mean real fast. So that presents a new challenge for the defense.”
New Orleans found a way to use Taysom Hill’s skill set as a big, athletic, 6-foot-2, 221-pounder beyond playing quarterback. Chuck Cook/USA TODAY Sports
Hill, now 27 after a five-year college career and a two-year Mormon mission, said it has been “big” for him to finally start translating everything he learned last season onto the field.

He has continued to do a little bit of work on special teams, but the plan is for him to spend more of his time on his primary job — where he is trying to earn the backup role in a competition with newly signed veteran Tom Savage and undrafted rookie J.T. Barrett.

Savage, a former starter for the Houston Texans, doesn’t have the same fanfare around him as Hill right now. But he has significantly more experience as the two are splitting time with the No. 2 offense.

“He throws the football really well. He throws a pretty ball — and accurate,” said Lombardi, who noted that Savage has been working on some fundamental things like changing his footwork to fit the Saints’ preferred drops.

A trio of newcomers behind Brees is a big departure for the Saints from years past, when they had established veterans such as Luke McCown or Chase Daniel in the backup role.

But Hill clearly learned one thing from Daniel last season. Hill has been racing Brees from drill to drill during OTA practices, fighting to be the first guy to step on a certain marker — continuing a heated competition that Brees and Daniel used to have among many others on a daily basis.

“Usually you’ve got to fight for body position a little bit to touch the [marker],” said Brees, who has also learned to appreciate Hill’s unique athletic makeup.

“He’s a little bit bigger and stronger than who we’ve normally had around here,” Brees said. “So I’ve got my work cut out for me now.”